Timothy J. Roupas

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Timothy J. Roupas
Au.D.
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Naples
Audiology
Center for Hearing
625 Tamiami Trail N., Suite 301
Naples
FL
34102

 Q:      I’ve heard that Bluetooth technology is the latest innovation in hearing devices.  How can Bluetooth technology improve my hearing?

A:      Bluetooth is a standardized, wireless close range personal network using a specific bandwidth to connect mobile devices.   Common uses are connections between cellular phones and earpieces/headsets, as well as laptops, personal computers, fax machines and similar data transfer applications.  By using Bluetooth in hearing technology, one’s cell phone is connected to their hearing devices, allowing for a hands free wireless connection and clear sound quality.  Hearing devices can also be connected wirelessly to television, iPad, laptop and many other devices.  

 

Q:      It seems the term “INVISIBLE” is not as important in hearing devices as it was a few years ago.   What is the reason? 

A:      The term “INVISIBLE” is not used very often now due to the limitations of these types of products.  There has been a substantial shift toward the importance of new wireless features in today’s hearing circuits, as well as in the physical comfort and sound quality that deep-canal fitted devices often cannot achieve.   Higher maintenance and likelihood of cerumen (earwax) –related problems also exist with the deeper (“INVISIBLE”) types of hearing devices when compared to today’s newest wireless models.   

 

Q:      What is a loop hearing system?   My church is having one installed soon.  Can this system actually help me to hear better?

A:      Loop systems have been popular in Western Europe for many years.  A loop system consists of a thin copper wire installed around the perimeter of a room and a small amplifier.  When sound or speech is transmitted throughout the wire, a magnetic field is created and the sound is then transmitted directly to a coil within one’s hearing device.  This provides a clear sound that can be customized to each individual’s hearing needs.  Loop systems may also be found in many other public venues.

 

Q:      I feel I can hear fairly well in quiet places.  But why do I have trouble understanding voices in a crowded restaurant where there is often background noise?

A:      Hearing and understanding speech are two separate abilities, however closely related.  Our brain’s ability to process and discriminate speech requires speed of neural processing and functional middle and inner ear systems.  Most hearing loss patterns are high-frequency, which affects our ability to hear soft voices and many consonants sounds of speech.  In high frequency losses the sensory organ of hearing is often damaged and cannot relay the necessary auditory information to the language centers within the brain, leading to speech discrimination problems.                 

Timothy J. Roupas
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Timothy J. Roupas
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