Charles R. Williams

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Charles R. Williams
Dr.
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Longview
Orthopaedic Sports Medicine
East Texas Orthopaedic Clinic
804 Medical Circle Drive. Ste. H
Longview
TX
75605

What are non-surgical options for treatment of arthritis?

With few exceptions, non-operative treatment should be attempted first. Initial treatments may include the use of nonimpact conditioning activities, specific strengthening exercises, and braces/orthotics. Tylenol, anti-inflammatory medications, or glucosamine compounds may help relieve pain and inflammation. Weight loss for individuals who are overweight minimizes pain and can slow progression of the disease. Occasional steroid injections or viscosupplementation may provide relief if the initial treatments are unsuccessful.

 

I have been told that I separated my shoulder. Does that mean it is out of the socket?

No. A shoulder separation is an injury to the joint at the outer end of the collarbone and the shoulder blade. It is usually caused by a blow to or fall onto the lateral shoulder. The injury sometimes results in prominence of the end of the collarbone. A separation is usually treated with a sling as needed for comfort, occasional pain medication, and gradual return to normal activities. Higher grade (more severe) injuries, or those in heavy laborers or the dominant arm in an overhead athlete, sometimes require surgical treatment. When the shoulder’s ball comes out of the socket, it is called a dislocation.

 

What is the difference between shoulder dislocation and shoulder subluxation?

These injuries most commonly occur when the arm is overhead and then forced backwards. A subluxation means that the ball part of the shoulder joint slips part way out of the socket, and then returns to its normal position. In a dislocation, the ball part of the shoulder comes completely out of the socket. The latter injury often requires a manual reduction by a healthcare professional, sometimes with sedation necessary. Recurrent subluxations can often be treated with exercises. Repeated dislocations or subluxations that don’t respond to conservative treatment often require surgical treatment.

Charles R. Williams
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Charles R. Williams
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